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Shoplifting

Shoplifting

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New Jersey Shoplifting Attorneys

Shoplifting is a very common, yet serious offense in New Jersey. Prosecutions for shoplifting are often vigorous and penalties are more severe than other theft offenses. If the value of the merchandise is at least $200, the shoplifting offense is a felony. This shoplifting statute is also broad as it includes the physical taking away of merchandise in addition to concealment and under-ringing. Thus, contrary to popular belief, you do not need to actually leave the store with any items to be found guilty of shoplifting.

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Our lawyers have a long track record of representing clients across New Jersey in a wide variety of shoplifting cases. We can help you avoid jail time and a criminal record. Call us today to discuss your shoplifting case with one of our tough, smart attorneys.

2C:20-11. Shoplifting

b. Shoplifting. Shoplifting shall consist of any one or more of the following acts:

(1) For any person purposely to take possession of, carry away, transfer or cause to be carried away or transferred, any merchandise displayed, held, stored or offered for sale by any store or other retail mercantile establishment with the intention of depriving the merchant of the possession, use or benefit of such merchandise or converting the same to the use of such person without paying to the merchant the full retail value thereof.

(2) For any person purposely to conceal upon his person or otherwise any merchandise offered for sale by any store or other retail mercantile establishment with the intention of depriving the merchant of the processes, use or benefit of such merchandise or converting the same to the use of such person without paying to the merchant the value thereof.

(3) For any person purposely to alter, transfer or remove any label, price tag or marking indicia of value or any other markings which aid in determining value affixed to any merchandise displayed, held, stored or offered for sale by any store or other retail mercantile establishment and to attempt to purchase such merchandise personally or in consort with another at less than the full retail value with the intention of depriving the merchant of all or some part of the value thereof.

(4) For any person purposely to transfer any merchandise displayed, held, stored or offered for sale by any store or other retail merchandise establishment from the container in or on which the same shall be displayed to any other container with intent to deprive the merchant of all or some part of the retail value thereof.

(5) For any person purposely to under-ring with the intention of depriving the merchant of the full retail value thereof.

(6) For any person purposely to remove a shopping cart from the premises of a store or other retail mercantile establishment without the consent of the merchant given at the time of such removal with the intention of permanently depriving the merchant of the possession, use or benefit of such cart.

c. Gradation. (1) Shoplifting constitutes a crime of the second degree under subsection b. of this section if the full retail value of the merchandise is $ 75,000 or more, or the offense is committed in furtherance of or in conjunction with an organized retail theft enterprise and the full retail value of the merchandise is $ 1,000 or more.

(2) Shoplifting constitutes a crime of the third degree under subsection b. of this section if the full retail value of the merchandise exceeds $ 500 but is less than $ 75,000, or the offense is committed in furtherance of or in conjunction with an organized retail theft enterprise and the full retail value of the merchandise is less than $ 1,000.

(3) Shoplifting constitutes a crime of the fourth degree under subsection b. of this section if the full retail value of the merchandise is at least $ 200 but does not exceed $ 500.

(4) Shoplifting is a disorderly persons offense under subsection b. of this section if the full retail value of the merchandise is less than $ 200.

f. Any person who possesses or uses any anti shoplifting or inventory control device countermeasure within any store or other retail mercantile establishment is guilty of a disorderly persons offense.

Our team of shoplifting defense lawyers will fight for you in any court in New Jersey for any theft charge including these charges:

  • Theft
  • Theft by Unlawful Taking or Disposition
  • Theft by Deception
  • Theft by Extortion
  • Receiving Stolen Property
  • Theft of Services
  • Embezzlement

With an office in New Brunswick, our shoplifting defense attorneys are easy to reach from anywhere in New Jersey. Call us today at 732-247-3340 to discuss your shoplifting case with one of our tough, smart criminal defense lawyers.

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